Super Ingredients – Kangaroo

Image Source – http://calorielab.com/news/wp-images/post-images/kangaroo-meat.jpg

Kangaroo is probably one of my favourite meats to cook with and the ONLY meat I ever purchase from the supermarket. There has been lots of press about the pros and cons of eating skippy so I thought I would give you a quick summary of why I like to keep it as a regular in our house.

Nutritionally kangaroo is fantastic like any other red meat, very high in protein, iron and zinc. People also love preaching the lean qualities of kangaroo. I am not concerned with eating meats with a higher fat content – eating the whole animal as many benefits and the right amounts of fat in your diet are important for health. But if the fat content of meat concerns you, then kangaroo is a fantastic choice. The only downside with this leanness is that it is definitely not a cut of meat that you eat well done as it will be dry and tough as old boats. Unless you cook with the mince which is a lot more forgiving.

Maggie Beer’s Roo Carpaccio Image Source: https://maggiebeer-images.s3.amazonaws.com/2012/08/07/02/28/51/076/kangaroo_carpaccio_10_misc_large.jpg

The big question is where does this roo meat come from. Are there kangaroo farms? No – all meat is harvested from wild animals. There are very strict protocols that come with this practice. To shoot kangaroos, an individual must be a licensed kangaroo harvester, having been educated in the relevant rules and regulations, animal welfare, hygiene controls, and firearm competency. In order for the animals to be processed each kangaroo must be supplied with tags, which can only be obtained if you are a licensed shooter. The expectation on the shooters is that all animals are to be killed with a single bullet to the brain and each licensee is regularly assessed on this criteria. Furthermore, there are controls on the number of kangaroos that can be harvested and this is accessed annually and according to area. Out of a population of over 20 million, approximately, 10-15% of kangaroos are killed for meat each year. All sounds a bit gruesome I know. But this is the reality of how our meat gets to our plates and this is a much pleasant process than some of the horrific factory farming practices out there.

Not really related to the post but adorable! Image Source: http://resources1.news.com.au/images/2013/05/17/1226645/196501-kangaroo-onsie.jpg

All of this means that any kangaroo meat you buy is 100% free range, which is fairly unique! I don’t think there is any other meat you can buy in Australia like that. In addition to this, controlling the kangaroo population like is only beneficial for the environment. Kangaroo levels in harvesting areas are at pest levels and they are destroying not only farming land but also causing havoc in natural bushland. It really is a smart management system.

The big question is now… how and when to cook with kangaroo? I normally cook with the steaks or fillets in place of normal beef or lamb steaks and I also love the mince especially with the price tag of $8 per kg. The flavour is somewhat stronger than beef, more gamey so I prefer it eaten when it has been marinaded or with some sort of condiment.

Here are some ideas to get you started:

Have you got any tips or recipes about eating and cooking with roo? Let me know!

Sources:

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Spice Cupboard Essentials
Super Ingredients - Broccoli

4 Responses to “Super Ingredients – Kangaroo”

  1. Cate

    Cool Sarah, I’d never have thunk of buying meat in the sewermarket but I’ll keep and eye out next time I’m there.

    Reply
    • Lady Homemade

      Sewermarket! HA! Roo is the only thing I buy from there though!

      Reply
  2. Alex

    Oh, we love kangaroo. It’s one of our favourite meats. I usually buy the fillets from woolworths. I’m German but have been living in Australia for 13 years now. Whenever my family come to visit, they look forward to eating kangaroo. I’ve always wondered whether the meat was farmed or wild. So thanks for telling me that it is 100% free range. I’ve noticed that there is a bit of quality variation and always thought that made sense for a wild product (depending on what the animal ate, etc.)
    I usually panfry it and then deglaze the pan with some red wine which makes a quick runny sauce. Delish!

    Reply
  3. Kangaroo Chilli | Lady Homemade

    […] a slightly different spice combo and of course with my favourite red meat kangaroo (read about why I love roo here). My version has coriander seeds in it as I like the more earthy flavour it brings. I have also […]

    Reply

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